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Ficus Benjamina The Weeping Fig


Ficus benjamina, often referred to as the weeping Ficus or weeping fig, is one of the most prolific plants and is widely used as a indoor plant an as large trees in interior landscapes.

The benjamina used to be considered a landscape plant of choice, but more recent studies have revealed that its aggressive root system and the enormous sizes Ficus can achieve have caused landscape designers and architects to rethink the use of this plant.

Today the Ficus sees limited landscape use, but is still grown in large quanities for indoor use. Outdoors there is great debate whether it should be planted outside as it has been known to disturb septic lines, crack concrete walkways and even cause major damage to building foundations.

The indoor use of Ficus benjamina, however, is highly praised by many of these same professionals and has made this plant a staple today for the interior plant industry. This is mainly due to the rapid growth and ease of maintenance of Ficus benjamina as well as the aesthetic value the plant adds to an otherwise bland room.

The plant does have a few small pesky problems, to name a few, scale insects, and of course cultural practices that are not conducive to plant health like over or under watering and too cold or too hot temperatures.

Once Ficus benjamina becomes acclimated to its final resting place very little effort is needed to maintain a good looking and healthy specimen. This plant will tolerate a great deal of abuse and frankly is difficult to kill.

The weeping fig will tell its owner it needs attention by dropping its beautiful dark green and glossy foliage. Get out the vacuum and find out why it wants to relieve itself of its most beautiful parts, maybe to expose its slender smooth grey stem and all its beauty to behold.


What are some reasons for leaf drop? Simply – changes. The roots are too wet or too dry or perhaps the radiator is too close or the ac unit is chilling your Ficus.

Once you’ve learned the secrets of caring for a Ficus as an indoor plant, you’ll be pleased with what it can offer to dress up a room. Ficus benjamina is a wonderful plant to own and care for as its beauty coupled with easy maintenance once you know what to look for, are equaled by only a handful of easy to maintain plants and unsurpassed by even fewer varieties.

Ficus Lyrata – Fiddle Leaf Fig


Ficus Lyrata is an original Masterpiece of nature with its broad, bold, giant leaves of living art that resembles a fiddle… hence the name “Fiddle leaf Fig.”

Broad – bold – giant leaves to decorate you home or office. A tree that’s looks out of the ordinary. What kind of a tree are we talking about? It’s the Ficus lyrata – the fiddle leaf fig or the banjo fig. The common name of the fiddle leaf fig comes from the large violin shaped leaves that clothe Ficus lyrata.

Having a bark and leaf texture that is coarse with grow upright and irregular irregular shape make Ficus lyrata a unique plant for indoor use. Lyrata can be trained to grow in a variety of shapes like lyrata braids, standards or bush form. It’s large leaves grow to over one foot long and six to eight inches wide have and in lower light conditions the leaves become softer, longer and a darker olive green. One the biggest benefits – few pests and easy to maintain.

Propagation in the past has been done by making air-layers. Over the last few years most of the propagation has moved to tissue culture or cloning. This method gives the plants a more uniform look.


Ficus lyrata care is like most of the Ficus trees. The lyrata can tolerate a great deal of abuse but will drop foliage if not minimally maintained. Find a place with good lighting to show off your Ficus and make it the conversation plant it is.

The Ficus lyrata in nature comes from Africa and is capable of reaching heights of over 40 feet. For more information on care, propagation and other Ficus related varieties click and visit – Our Homeowners Ficus Care Guide.

Ficus ‘Wiandi’


Ficus Wiandi is a new cultivar and a sister plant to Ficus ‘Rianne, although it has slightly smaller leaves, the plant has a free-form growth pattern that is slightly horizontally dominant. Like ‘Rianne’, ‘Wiandi’ has the look of bonsai, with branches that zig and zag between internodes, often turning at right angles.

‘Wiandi’ has very low light and humidity requirements as compared to those of other ficus cultivars. As with its sister plant, ‘Wiandi’ should be boxed without sleeves during transportation because its branches are fragile.

The temperature requirements for ‘Wiandi’ is a comfortable 78 to 90 F days, 70 to 75 F nights. Ficus leaves do accumulate dust. Wipe leaves regularly with a damp cloth to remove dust.

Do you have what it takes to care for a Ficus? Learn the secrets of Ficus Care with Our Homeowners Ficus Care Guide.

Ficus ‘Monique’


Most Popular of New Benjamina Types

Ficus Monique is an upright Ficus benjamina type with a bushy growth pattern. Its elliptical leaves are a shiny, bright green and have ruffled edges that become more accentuated in lower light conditions. Its mature leaves are hard and crispy. ‘Monique’ will adapt to higher light levels where installations dictate.

One of the most outstanding features of this plant is its resistance to leaf drop. Several interior landscapers report such great success with ‘Monique’ in terms of resisting leaf drop.

To date, ‘Monique’ is the most popular of the new ficus varieties, and is rapidly replacing ‘Wintergreen’ in the interior landscape. Popular forms include standard tree, -braided trunk, bush and topiary. ‘Monique’ is also known for its superior shipping and consumer performance.

The temperature requirements for ‘Monique’ is a comfortable 78 to 90 F days, 70 to 75 F nights. Ficus leaves do accumulate dust. Wipe leaves regularly with a damp cloth to remove dust.

Do you have what it takes to care for a Ficus? Learn the secrets of Ficus Care with Our Homeowners Ficus Care Guide.

Ficus ‘Midnight’


A sister plant of Ficus ‘Indigo’, resulting from a multigenerational selection process. Ficus ‘Midnight’ has extremely dark, bluish to black, glossy leaves that sit along the stem with very close internodes.

Its growth pattern is upright with a strong apical dominance. It also displays a compact, bushy habit.

The plant has performed very well in doors, growing for extended periods under 50, footcandles. This cultivar is recommended for use in commercial installations with 100 foot- candles to 150 foot-candles for optimal performance. Due to its compact habit, there may be some initial interior leaf drop during it final acclimation phase when placed on the job. However, new leaves will continue to emerge, refoliating and replacing any shedding that may occur.

The temperature requirements for ‘Midnight’ is a comfortable 78 to 90 F days, 70 to 75 F nights. Ficus leaves do accumulate dust. Wipe leaves regularly with a damp cloth to remove dust.

Do you have what it takes to care for a Ficus? Learn the secrets of Ficus Care with Our Homeowners Ficus Care Guide.

Ficus Indigo


Description: Ficus ‘Indigo’

Ficus ‘Indigo’ has very thick, dark leaves that grow under very low light levels. Its leaves emerge deep green and darken with maturity to almost blue-black with a high-gloss. As the outer leaves darkens, a slight variegation appears, radiating from the leaf’s midrib.

Its medium-to-long, irregular internodes give ‘Indigo’ an open, weepy appearance. It is grown as braided trunks, standard trunks, and topiaries.

‘Indigo’, which is the first in a series of dark-leaved Ficus benjamina types. It has shown top performance status during an independent dark box and simulated transportation tests conducted in Europe.

The temperature requirements for ‘Indigo’ is a comfortable 78 to 90 F days, 70 to 75 F nights. Ficus leaves do accumulate dust. Wipe leaves regularly with a damp cloth to remove dust.

Do you have what it takes to care for a Ficus? Learn the secrets of Ficus Care with Our Homeowners Ficus Care Guide.

Ficus Amstel King


Description: The “Improved” Banana Leaf Ficus

This Ficus variety has long, banana-shaped leaves. The large, leathery, fast- growing foliage has a lush tropical appeal. This plant has similar growth habits to Ficus Alli, but has many wider, thicker and somewhat larger leaves. During active growth periods, growth tips are a very pronounced pink to red that contrasts beautifully against the broad, shiny leaves. ‘Amstel King’ holds its foliage extremely well indoors.

The temperature requirements for ‘Amstel King’ is a comfortable 78 to 90 F days, 70 to 75 F nights. Ficus leaves do accumulate dust. Wipe leaves regularly with a damp cloth to remove dust.

Do you have what it takes to care for a Ficus? Learn the secrets of Ficus Care with Our Homeowners Ficus Care Guide.

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